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Onlyoffice and Portainer Docker Install

Onlyoffice and Portainer Docker Install

It’s all fun and games, until someone gets hurt… here is how I setup OnlyOffice and Portainer using Docker. I am using a vps running Debian 10.

OnlyOffice

sudo docker run -i -t -d -p 32769:443 --restart=always \
-v /app/onlyoffice/DocumentServer/logs:/var/log/onlyoffice \
-v /app/onlyoffice/DocumentServer/data:/var/www/onlyoffice/Data \
-v /app/onlyoffice/DocumentServer/lib:/var/lib/onlyoffice \
-v /app/onlyoffice/DocumentServer/db:/var/lib/postgresql onlyoffice/documentserver-ee

Once the container is up and running, copy your ssl security information. I copy my user ssl.crt and ssl.ca into a single file: onlyoffice.crt, which should be installed at /app/onlyoffice/DocumentServer/data/certs/.

Next, copy the ssl.key to /app/onlyoffice/DocumentServer/data/certs/onlyoffice.key. Make it read-only by doing chmod 400 onlyoffice.key.

Copy your license file to /app/onlyoffice/DocumentServer/data/license.lic.

Restart the docker container, and you’re good to go. You can access the status page at https://yourwebsite:32769.

Portainer

First, I create the directory: /app/portainer/local-certs.

Next, I copy the ssl certificates to the directory I just created. They are are same as the onlyoffice ones, except I rename them portainer.crt and portainer.key.

docker run -d -p 9000:9000 -p 8000:8000 --name portainer --restart always -v /var/run/docker.sock:/var/run/docker.sock -v /app/portainer/local-certs:/certs -v portainer_data:/data portainer/portainer-ce --ssl --sslcert /certs/portainer.crt --sslkey /certs/portainer.key

Portainer can be accessed at https://yourwebsite:9000.

Solus Linux Installation Issue

Solus Linux Installation Issue

Whenever I first install Solus Linux, the installer never adds Solus to the UEFI Boot Menu. Here are the steps to fix that issue:

Boot from your live CD/USB. Connect to the internet, and do the following:

Install efibootmgr: sudo eopkg it efibootmgr

(This paragraph probably isn’t necessary, but I am including it to remember how to clean up the UEFI Boot Menu 🙂 )
Run efibootmgr with no arguments. You should see an entry for Linux Boot Manager, which for some reason doesn’t show up in your actual boot menu but does here. There’s a number listed for that entry. Delete it with sudo efibootmgr -b [num] -B

Now you can recreate it. If your EFI partition is /dev/sda1 then do this: sudo efibootmgr -c -d /dev/sda -p 1 -l "\EFI\systemd\systemd-bootx64.efi" -L "Linux Boot Manager"

No Kernel Panic on Shutdown

No Kernel Panic on Shutdown

Okay, so my new computer likes to fail to shutdown in Linux with a kernel panic. Here’s the solution to fix it.

If using Grub:
Add initcall_blacklist=dw_i2c_init_driver to the kernel command line.

Run in the terminal: sudo nano -w /etc/default/grub
Append blacklist string to the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="… initcall_blacklist=dw_i2c_init_driver"
Save the file.
For Debian:  sudo update-grub
For Fedora:  grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/efi/EFI/fedora/grub.cfg
For Arch: grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg
Reboot and test!

If using goofiboot (Solus):
sudo nano -w /etc/kernel/cmdline
Insert the following line: initcall_blacklist=dw_i2c_init_driver
Save the file.
sudo clr-boot-manager update
Reboot and test!

If using systemd-boot (Pop_OS):
sudo nano -w /etc/kernelstub/configuration
Insert the following line: "initcall_blacklist=dw_i2c_init_driver", Unless it is the final item in the list, do not miss the trailing comma!
Save the file.
sudo kernelstub
Reboot and test!